Germain Grisez: A Tribute from a Fellow Mount Professor

The following is a guest post from Dr. Joshua Hochschild, Msgr. Robert Kline Professor of philosophy at Mount St. Mary’s University. Germain Grisez, philosopher and theologian, died yesterday.  I expect tributes to pour in, as his influence on Catholic intellectual life has been strong for six decades.  His students and collaborators, and even many of his critics, will have things to say about his momentous contributions.  I want to add something from the perspective of the place he called home for thirty years. For many people, the first thing they knew about Mount St. Mary’s is that Germain Grisez...

Read More

Important Seamless Garment Pro-life News

The bishop of Little Rock has taken a strong pro-life stand – one that includes not only being anti-abortion, but also anti-death penalty. Many of the people writing for this blog have written about the importance of being broadly pro-life.  I am one such person who finds that being pro-life means having deep concern about our whole culture of death, including abortion and euthanasia, as well as our treatment of death-row inmates, our perception of just war, and our use of the environment in which we live. My source for this from Catholic tradition is from Saint Pope John...

Read More

BCTS condemnation of President Trump’s remarks

On this Martin Luther King Day, our colleagues at the Black Catholic Theological Symposium have issued a statement condemning the remarks that President Trump allegedly made about “s-hole countries.” Please read their full statement. An excerpt: We subscribe to the words of James Baldwin, “Ignorance allied with power is the most ferocious enemy justice can have.” Mr. Trump’s comments are woefully racist, ignorant, xenophobic, and inflammatory. Racism is undeniably evil. The evil of racism is always incapable of critiquing itself; therefore, it must be condemned whenever and wherever it arises. Racism is a question of power and not merely...

Read More

Beth Haile and Catholic Moral Theology

The following is a guest post about our friend and charter blogger, Beth Haile, written by Dr. Brian Matz, currently the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet Chair in Catholic Thought at Fontbonne University. Brian was Beth Haile’s colleague when they both taught at Carroll College in Helena, Montana. If you are interested in helping support the medical expenses of the Haile family, please consider donating at the GoFundMe page set up on their behalf. The world of Catholic moral theology is losing a good friend. Dr. Beth Haile, a founding member and longtime contributor to this blog, has...

Read More

The Incarnation and Public Moral Conflict

The new year is always an opportunity to get back to basics. I don’t know about you, but I found 2017 difficult… and sometimes disorienting. One can hope that such disorientation is for the good, but it can also be worrisome. We live in a morally tense time. Conflicts in both church and world rise to the surface, and charity becomes harder and harder to come by. In such times, it is more important than ever to remind ourselves of the basics, and in this season of Christmas, one such basic is the Incarnation, the Word made flesh who...

Read More

The Fourth Sunday of Advent: Preparing Him Room

2 SM 7:1-5, 8B-12, 14A, 16 PS 89:2-3, 4-5, 27, 29 ROM 16:25-27 LK 1:26-38 As I read this week’s lectionary scriptures, I’m reminded of the hymn “Joy to the World” by Isaac Watts: Let ev’ry heart prepare Him room And heaven and nature sing! And heaven and nature sing! And heaven, and heaven, and nature sing! “Joy to the World” is a Christmas hymn, and so I imagine some readers wondering why I appear to be truncating Advent! After all, this year’s fourth “week” of Advent turns out to be merely a day – less than a day,...

Read More

Why Catholics in Alabama Should Vote for Doug Jones

I can’t vote in the December 12th election in Alabama, but I know many voters who can. As someone who grew up in Mobile, Alabama, I know from personal experience that Alabama is a complex place and that it does a tremendous disservice to residents of that state to offer oversimplified caricatures of bigots, fundamentalists, racists, and stupid country folk. At the same time, the Roy Moore phenomenon is hard to explain and it is harder still to understand how some Catholics can rationalize a vote for him in the upcoming U.S. Senate race. For anyone on the fence,...

Read More