Author: Jessica Wrobleski

Getting Real with Pope Francis (and his critics)

Whether in the classroom or in casual conversation, one of the most persistent challenges I encounter as a Catholic moral theologian comes from those who argue, sometimes smugly and sometimes with sadness, that while virtuous action and social solidarity built on respect for human life may be great ideals, they simply aren’t realistic.  Yes, they may say, factory farming is terrible, but it’s just not “realistic” to expect people to give up their cheap, convenient meats.  Sure, honesty and generosity in relationships and business are noble ideals, but cheating and selfishness are far more common—and no one wants to...

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Late Have I Loved You…

The following is a contribution to the Faith of the Theologians series, to which I am honored and humbled to add my voice…. On hearing it, many of his disciples said, This is a hard teaching.  Who can accept it?” . . . From this time many of his disciples turned back and no longer followed him. “You do not want to leave too, do you?” Jesus asked the Twelve. Simon Peter answered him, “Lord, to whom shall we go? You have the words of eternal life.” This scene from John 6 has long been one of my favorites...

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The Hospitable Pope?

We are now over a hundred days into the Franciscan papacy, and it’s clear that people both within and outside the church see something about Francis which differs in appealing ways from what they have come to expect from the Catholic Church and its Supreme Pontiff.  This past week, even a blogger for esquire.com who self-identified as an atheist wrote that he had to admit that Pope Francis is “kind of awesome.”  While the approval of Esquire magazine—which is not exactly known for promoting the virtues of poverty, chastity, or obedience—may be a dubious endorsement, I think it does...

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Prophetic Conversations: A Review

Having spent my first two years of teaching at Saint Mary’s College (Notre Dame, IN), I can personally attest to the way in which the College successfully fosters the voices and gifts of young women in an environment that is both rigorous and nurturing, both critical of and faithful to Catholic tradition.  It is therefore unsurprising to me that a book like Women, Wisdom, and Witness: Engaging Contexts in Conversation (Liturgical Press, 2012) should have emerged from SMC’s Center for Spirituality.  Both in its rich content and distinctive form, the book offers a valuable contribution to the field of Catholic theology, which will be of interest to many readers of this blog. Coedited by Rosemary Carbine and the Center for Spirituality’s Director Kathleen Dolphin, the book is in fact a project authored collaboratively by the New Voices Seminar, which has met annually since 2004 and seeks to provide a forum to articulate and advance women’s voices within the Catholic Church and academy.  The Seminar, which is held in conjunction with SMC’s annual Madeleva Lecture in Spirituality[1], is described by the editors as an “intergenerational and in many ways diverse group of roughly forty to fifty women scholars who take an interdisciplinary approach to the study of Christianity,” (ix).  Indeed, the fifteen or so contributors to this book each speaks from her own experience and expertise in order to contribute...

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