Praying and “Framing”

Why is prayer, liturgy, and studying the Bible important?  One reason is that these activities shape the way in which we make decisions.  Some recent work on “framing” from behavioral economics, neuroscience, and psychology shed some light on how they do so.  Psychologist Amos Tversky and economist Daniel Kahneman were the first to establish the concept of “framing”:  people respond to situations differently depending upon how they interpret it.  Connecting this concept with research in neuroscience, Jonah Lehrer, author of How We Decide, states that [framing] helps explain why people are much more likely to buy meat when it’s labeled 85 percent lean instead of 15 percent fat.  And why twice as many patients opt for surgery when told there’s an 80 percent chance of their surviving instead of a 20 percent chance of their dying.  Dan Arliely, the behavior economist and author of Predictably Irrational, gives the example that high-priced entrées on the menu boost revenue for the restaurant—even if no one buys them.  Why?  Because even though people generally won’t buy the most expensive dish on the menu, they will order the second most expensive dish.  Thus, by creating an expensive dish, a restaurateur can lure customers into ordering the second most expensive choice (which can be cleverly engineered to deliver a higher profit margin). When my daughter flipped through the pages of her children’s picture Bible,...

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