Libya: Process = Justice?

Are Bush and Obama both unjust? Over at dotCommonweal, Peter Nixon notes that Obama makes “Bush’s pace” look “positively dilatory,” since at least in the lead-up to the Iraq war, there was a vigorous debate about justice. NPR reported this morning that the British parliament will be debating this, but that the advocate for the government will argue that the war is “legal” because of the UN resolution. This is also apparently what is supposed to make us think Obama is acting rationally and carefully, and not like a “cowboy.” We are witnessing the reduction of justice to process. What makes a war just (apparently) is not its aims, but the process by which it is entered. Indeed, the ambiguity (or confusion) over exactly what the aims are is bad-to-embarrassing. In the American context, the Bush and Obama administrations seem to provide constant reminders that the political options available to Catholics are frustrating. Either the view of justice is substantively wrong, or the view of justice is empty. We get the “dictatorship of relativism” or simply...

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Is Nebraska’s Fetal Pain Bill Cruel?

After teaching the principle of double effect last week, I had a student approach me this Thursday questioning whether inducing labor in Danielle Deaver’s case would qualify.  My student said he was “really disturbed that doctors wouldn’t induce labor for a woman when both her and her unborn child were experiencing such severe suffering. It seems cruel.” Until my student brought it to my attention, I had not heard of Danielle Deaver, the woman who the Nebraska State Paper reports was forced, due to the state’s new abortion law, to “live through ten excruciating days, waiting to give birth to a baby that she and her doctors knew would die minutes later, fighting for breath that would not come.” Nebraska recently enacted legislation that made abortion illegal at 20 weeks after gestation, citing evidence that at 20 weeks, the fetus can feel pain.  According to the Deaver’s interview with Planned Parenthood, Danielle was 22 weeks along when her water broke.  Danielle reports that doctors told her that even if it were possible to carry the baby to term, she would likely be born without functioning lungs and with contractures due to the fact that the uterus, without amniotic fluid, was pushing on the baby.  Her physician, Dr. Todd Pankcatz, confirmed with the Des Moines Register that the Deaver’s did in fact request an abortion, but that due to the...

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Torture, Accusations and Humanity

Next weekend, Duke University will host its conference on torture, which has a very specific goal in mind: identifying that “torture is always wrong, torture does not make ‘us’ safer, and we need concrete tactics to refuse the climate of fear and and compliance.”   The conference is broadly ecumenical and also interfaith, including Muslim voices too.  And, it has a variety of well-known people presenting who have long been involved in advocating against torture. I wish I could go and be a Catholic voice in this mix.  The magisterial teaching of the Catholic Church is that torture is always wrong, as well (see Compendium 404) because of the tradition’s strong belief in the integrity of the human person and the possibility of that person to turn toward good ways of living – even when that person is accused of murder or sexual abuse or other horrendous crimes.  Torture, as a way of breaking people mentally, physically and spiritually, cannot be a humane way of relating to other humans.  I find this actually comforting, for my own part: given the number of people who have been falsely found guilty (as confirmed by DNA tests) I’d rather know that if I were ever accused of something, at least from the point of view of the church, I still possess a fundamental human dignity. Culturally, however, it’s far more difficult.  Accusations have a way...

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Should Catholics stand up for public workers?

The recent events in Wisconsin over Gov. Scott Walker’s plans to discipline the compensation and bargaining rights of public workers is exactly the kind of public controversy in which Catholics ought to have a voice… but often don’t. Much of the debate is portrayed as a question of whether public workers are overcompensated. The New York Times constructed a graphic  that attempts to get at the “complexity” of the issue, but the lens used is telling. Like most reports, the standard is a comparison between public and private wage and benefit levels. Besides the problem of comparing the diverse work...

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